poll -- Madison reefers, do you use RO/DI?

Madison Area Reef Society - Club and reef discussion

Moderator: BraenDead

Do you use RO/DI Water?

Yes
19
90%
No
2
10%
 
Total votes : 21

poll -- Madison reefers, do you use RO/DI?

Postby Studioksr on Tue Mar 01, 2005 8:43 am

I am wondering how many Madison people do use RO/DI?

I don't know if there is any difference in water quality by area of Madion, I am especially interested in the westside, since that is where I am.

Has anyone here tested city water carefully?

I am eager to learn if you Do or Do NOT use RO?DI and how long your tank/s have been running.

Thanks!

I am going to try to figure out how to do the poll thing properly . . .

(Edit by Bob - Added Poll)
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Postby tapper of spines on Tue Mar 01, 2005 8:53 am

I use RO/DI and I am on the west side. The last time I checked, when my TDS meter was working, my tap water had a TDS reading of about 200ppm.

HTH
TOS
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Postby BraenDead on Tue Mar 01, 2005 9:09 am

Hope you don't mind me editing your post to include a poll :)

I also use RO/DI, mainly because I want to do absolutely everything possible to make sure I never have to deal with any algae issues.

Bob
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Postby friogatto on Tue Mar 01, 2005 9:41 am

I just checked mine (Madison East Side) and it was at 398.
I use a Typhoon III from airwaterice and have a TDS of 0-5.
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Postby Studioksr on Tue Mar 01, 2005 9:42 am

Thanks, I tried to do a poll, but it doesnt look any diferent. I haven't ever done a poll before. Will it appear different?
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Postby Studioksr on Tue Mar 01, 2005 9:45 am

I know that TDS means total disolved solids, right? But how do we know if those are bad solids, phosphate, etc? Madison has hard water, but the thing I always have wondered about is how much of those "hard water" minerals and other things are bad, and are some of them actually beneficial?

Thanks for adding comments in addition to the poll!

Any success stories without RO/DI, or should I really do RO/DI?
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Postby BraenDead on Tue Mar 01, 2005 10:21 am

I think you can request or at least find a water analysis available from the city which details what minerals/ions/molecules and in what quantity are found in the water. If you anyone has this information for Madison, I think it would be great to post this here.

Bob
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Postby bobbet43 on Wed Mar 02, 2005 6:32 pm

In Stoughton I use RO and my TDS from the tap is any where from 300 to 400 and 0 coming out
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Postby snorulz on Wed Mar 02, 2005 7:16 pm

I just got my ro unit today. I also am in stoughton. My house shows a tds reading of 260. Seems rather low for a 110 year old house with original plumbing. But the gauge should be accurate. I do have a question about ro water. Do you need to add any additives to make it good for a tank? Besides salt that is when doing water changes. I have never used it before so i would love to hear everyones advice. Thanks
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Ro

Postby meisen on Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:24 am

Proper synthetic salt mixes (ahem.....) should have all that you need to add to RO water. The idea with using RO is that its a "blank slate" and wont skew ion concentrations from NSW once the syn. saltwater is mixed. When you use RO for topoff, you aren't adding anything but pure water. Otherwise, certain excess things like copper, aluminum, phosphate etc. would be added and concentrated as you topped off the tank over time. Ultimately, toxic /unfavorable concentrations would build up and you get things like nuisance algae, failure to thrive, inhibition to calcification etc.

One tip is to let your mixed saltwater sit for a day or two. For whatever reason, freshly mixed SSW is rather hard on invertebrate life. I seem to remember a study that Ron Shimeck did that showed near 100% toxicity to larval sea urchins. Not that any of us are trying to grow larval sea urchins but you get the idea. I dont do anything besides mix it up but you might want to throw a powerhead in there as well. If you are really wanting to reduce stress on your critters, powerhead and heat your water change resevoir.
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Postby BraenDead on Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:29 am

A powerhead is a good idea to keep the dissolved oxygen levels at good levels. If the water sits idle for a while, the disolved oxygen will drop significantly and can be harsh on the tank.

Bob
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Postby meisen on Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:58 am

Bob,

I agree, although IMHO, changes that are <5% are pretty insignificant with reguards to dissolved O2 levels (unless the tank itself is at a marginal level). Probably doing water changes early in the morning before the lights come on (when O2 is presumably at a minimum) wouldn't be good. A larger change than 10% however and your point is very significant. I dont know who out there is doing >10% changes on a regular basis but that in itself seems contraindicated except in emergencies and maybe some new tanks.
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Postby BraenDead on Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:06 am

I definately agree that it is normally not significant, however I thought it worthwhile to point out just in case someone needs to do a large water change in an emergency. If their water were poorly aerated, it might cause more issues than had originally warranted the emergency water change.

All good points, though :)

Bob
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Postby snorulz on Thu Mar 03, 2005 5:39 pm

hmmmm, i change out about 12 gallons every 2 weeks. My tank is only a 55, i had read that you are supposed to do 20% water changes every 2 weeks, is this bad?
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Postby BraenDead on Thu Mar 03, 2005 8:05 pm

I really dont think it is bad, but it might be excessive. If you have high nutrient levels, definately keep it up as it will help reduce these levels (though only a bandaid to the source of the problem). The larger the change, the more important you match critical levels such as salinity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, etc...

Bob
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